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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
, guns, his approach to the fiscal cliff, his approach to the debt ceiling. everyinning tonally is this is -- it's not my way or the highway, but it's much more my way than, hey, let's meet in the middle. it's sort of like i won, deal with this reality, and let's move forward. we'll see. it's actually worked pretty good effect thus far on things like the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling. republicans will try to draw a line somewhere. i'm not sure why yet. >> they thought they could draw it on national security with chuck hagel, and we've seen in the last 48 hours the president picked up the phone and he cauldron widen. he hasn't called too many senators too often, even in his own party. he cauldron widen because they had a real obstacle, and he knew that his cia nominee, his close friend, someone he is really eager to have confirmed john brennan, was in trouble going to that hearing. now not so much trouble. >> not so much trouble. these hearings are always as much about the -- using the moment as a lever to dislodge things that congress wants as they are about the nominee himself.
to start figuring out what to do with the debt ceiling. all we did is kick the can down the road. we didn't solve any problems so from a derivatives perspective all we're seeing is them taking this without money puts and even capping their upside to buy downside and almost zero cost with put spread callers. >> you think that an investor optimism is up and you think that's a positive for the markets this year. what's your take on the year of the snake and the implications? >> well, maria, i have to tell you i'm immediately skeptical of any investment philosophy based on horscopes. the only way those things work is there's something else going on, some kind of causation to go with the correlation, and when i looked at past markets, markets like 1965, 1989, 2001, the one common denominator that i found that i don't think is in place in 2013 is valuation. on the price matters framework that we use here at river front, particularly in '01 and 1965, those equity markets started those years of the snake at way above their long-term trend return averages which empirically we found to suggest subp
. >> nobody is worried about this upcoming debate on sequestration, on the debt ceiling. you think that creates noise and disruption. >> i do, maria. i think that you've got a trifecta coming off, you've got the skywest raise and the debt ceiling and the eurozone so there's still a lot of volatility out there, so that's have we're cautiously optimistic. you need to be properly allocated in order to reap the rewards of the greatest capital machine in the world which is our united states stock market. >> thanks, everybody. appreciate your time. >> we'll see you soon in the final stretch of trading. we've got a market that's higher on the dow jones industrial average. >> remember, the dow needs to be up 66 points or there abouts to be positive. don't look now but suddenly apple is up past $475 a share and it's all because big investors have a beef with the board. we'll talk to one major investor who is on apple's side in this battle. >> look outside new york city and our cnbc headquarters. it is bad and it's getting worse. the big worry now, power outages. believe it or not, there we
from the may deadline they've come up with, which is the debt ceiling. so they've passed a law to temporarily not enforce that debt ceiling until may. so two big deadlines. march 1 and may 18. >> we do a lot of kicking the can. but almost always they come to a resolution in the 11th hour, like karen said. and there is some encouraging news, 157,000 new hires in january is not what they were expecting. so there some encouraging news out there. we don't have to panic. but we do need to get our pocketbooks in check. and our government has a hard time doing that. >> just because the dow is over 14,000, that's a great sign. people forget those days, 6,500 when we were at the worst of the crisis, so to be over 14,000 right now is a big deal. so we'll see what's next. >> right. let's get this going. >>> federal prosecutors are going after the huge ratings agency standards and poors with connection to the mortgage meltdown. the justice department claims that s&p kept giving top ratings to investments it's own analysts warned were two risky. >> while big bankers and lenders built mortga
. that was an exchange for republicans agreeing to raise the debt ceiling. and january 1st, the fiscal cliff deal, decided to push it off for 60 days and now here we are. under the terms of the earlier budget deals, now must find $85 billion somewhere by march 1st otherwise pentagon spending will shrink. and medicare will take a 2% reduction. the president and democrats prefer an option that raises more money by closing tax loopholes. republicans want to stick with spending cuts saying they've already agreed to tax hikes. 448,000 jobs in dc, maryland and virginia could be affected. concerned about the impact on our economy. >> sequestration will hurt not only the defense side but the nondefense side. my committee funds the fbi. there will probably be furloughs at the fbi and the national cancer institute, nih. defense and nondefense. >> that hurts the broader economy. people are concerned about their jobs and don't know the impact on their bank accounts. that holds them from spending on movies and restaurants and theaters. thinks he has time to buy a little bit more of a deal. let republicans and
for the federal government's ability to borrow new money. the measure will suspend the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling until the middle of may. the bill also requires members of the house and senate to pass a budget by mid-april or risk having their own pay withheld. >>> the dow's bounce above 14,000 didn't last long. worry about europe dragged the market down yesterday, the biggest losses of the year. the dow was down 129. the nasdaq lost 48. in the previous session, the dow had hit its highest level in years. >>> the u.s. government plans to file a civil lawsuit against the ratings agency standard & poor's. the suit accuses the firm of giving high ratings to risky mortgage bond and led to the 2008 financial crisis. s&p says the suit is without merit. >>> medical marijuana has been legal in california since 1996. but now some cities are banning the dispensaries. a ruling will soon determine how far state law can go to protect their right to do business. the state supreme court will hear arguments today on whether local governments can ban them. right now a
. the last time the debt ceiling fight, president obama got what he wanted by refusing to negotiate. now the top republican up here on capitol hill john boehner is taking the hard line and letting the president know it. president obama was rallying democrats for the battle over defrs cuts when house republicans sent him a message. the symbolic vote he detail how he would cut the deficit to avoid the automatic spending cuts next month. >> mr. president, you missed the deadline again. let's see your plan. let's show it to the american people and have the discussion about the proper way to manage down this debt and deficit. >> reporter: without a budget deal on march 1st so-called sequestration will force reductions in military training, cutbacks in operations, and layoffs of civilian pentagon employees plus civilian defense contractors. >> it's an idiotic management nightmare to try to run a complex sophisticated, long-term program when you have short-term, massive cuts. >> reporter: deep cuts also loom in social services. outgoing defense secretary panetta slammed democrats and republican
the debt ceiling. if republicans had gone into this issue and said they would not raise the debt ceiling unless they got cuts, there would have lost that the raid at the end. big loss that debate. john boehner and paul rand did a great job together. you cannot govern from that office, you but you have to be very careful about high-profile last-minute negotiations. i've worked in the white house and three administrations. the president has a tremendous institutional advantage in these kinds of fights. what republicans have to do is avoid these fights, the straps that they are laying. provide an alternative through passing legislation, just to show this is how they would govern if they had the powers of the presidency and the senate. and be careful. there are some rough edges. host: some are not strategy as far as moving the debt ceiling ahead. guest: if they had gone ahead with it, it would have been politically cataclysmic. it was the worst percival -- worst possible ground to make their point. president obama 1. i think it's absolutely crucial for the future of the country that you cann
steps they want to put in place to get more people back to work. >> fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling, immigration he said there's room but, look, republicans need to get religion on this. do you expect a similar tone in the state of the union? >> he has a limited amount of time. they feel they have a so-called m mandate from their victory not losing the senate. i think it's kind of full speed ahead for the president right now. he's going to go as bold as he can go, limited amount of time. i think i disagree a little bit on the economy. i think it's a course correction for him. i feel he's maybe second-guessing, not talking about the economy during his inaugural speech, now maybe i should have talked about that. >> which is fascinating because if you look at the first term in a lot of ways, you know, he started off -- you had a republican party that was largely kind of in the doldrums and he started off with economic stimulus and health care which united the party in some way. is he -- is he smart to refocus on the economy, jim? >> yes. >> and probably the more important question, is
did it on -- he did it on the debt ceiling. he did it on sandy aid. could it be -- could his days be numbered? >> after the fiscal cliff. he promised he wouldn't do it again. he told his members. he has said that he won't do it again, but there's going to be pressure on a ton of issues, and, you know, for him it's going to be a personal decision. in some ways that's how it's framed in washington whether it comes down to whether or not there will be a continuation of the hastert rule. it's about speakership. >> in terms of let's say it's a rosier picture than we thought it would be on gun safety laws. i guess how much of that rosyness carries through on immigration. it could really go either way, i think. there is still a debate over the path to sit sflenship. >> as well as on immigration frankly. i'm not down there counting votes, and howard might be -- you put a number 30, 40 house republicans that would be for some sort of gun control. on immigration it almost seems like the numbers are closer to 100. especially in some of the conservative districts. that's really what's changed
. >> well, the president just signed the bill that raises the debt ceiling. so in an age where these fiscal fights are, they're the same, they're ongoing, they can be insecendiary incendiary, we're always talking about a government shutdown of one kind or another, where does this leave us? >> it leaves us with a bunch of people who just fought the first fight, and the senate democrats are going to annapolis today and tomorrow to try to figure out, how do we move forward? how do we move forward with a budget? how do we move forward on funding the government? both of those things need to be done by april 15th. >> because they have taken some hits. and do they really want to give republicans anymore ammunition? >> that's why they've said, we're going to do a budget. and they were happy to sign the increase, meant they had a deadline of april 15th, where they don't get paid, and they have to get a budget done. >> always a good incentive there. >> so democrats understand that they need that, but this is going to be a partisan document by and large, saying, here's our spending priorities. democra
, but things look good. we did not go over the fiscal cliff and we did not hit the debt ceiling. evidence is piling up. >> that's true. here is the thing that struck me about hagel hearings, it seemed at times that chuck hagel was surprised that these people were not happy with him. it's as if he did not read a newspaper in month. >> his response to the surge question. mccain is the biggest supporter of the surge, he led it. chuck hagel disagreed and mccain seems to be right. and hagel looked surprised by the question. in defense of molly's story and washington is getting better. that was not about dysfunction of washington, the two of them just do not like each other. that has nothing to do do with the broader things washington. the issue matrix is changing a bit. what we with saw in 2009 and 2010, when health care and economy were on the table, those are where the parties are fundamentally divided. that is going to be true. but the immigration, there's not the same divide with them. so it's not a polarizing issue with john kerry. part of the reason we are seeing less dysfunction -- on o
with the continuing resolution looming. they have card to play they didn't have to play in the debt ceiling. martha: how do you expect that to play out? do you think they can hold the line on it and get significant spending cuts that a lot of folks in this country wanted to see first time around? >> republicans have become good at caving. i think some part of sequestration will go through. but using aircraft carriers against the republicans. they will fold. rick: we are three weeks away from what could be painful budget cuts. they kick in automatically march 1. we'll tell you what americans find so taxing about the president's plan to fix the mess. martha: get ready for a blizzard. a winter storm historic proportions we are being told. >> now is the time before the storm hits. get your shovels ready. sand, fill your gas tanks in your cars. make sure you have enough heating fuel. you know, for at least a week. sometimes life can be well, a little uncomfortable. but when it's hard or hurts to go to the bathroom, there's dulcolax stool softener. dulcolax stool softener doesn't make you go, it just mak
overseas. your push right now is getting it back home. >> with the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and trying to get bipartisan, but over here is something called poverty, 50 million americans and racial disparity and cities collapsing and the like. i'm going to make the case we should build america an urban infrastructural bank for the purpose of long-term loans. we do it in europe and japan. and no other country charges people to repatriate their money once they pay taxes in that country. but we do. but if we, in fact, took a portion of that money, part for research and development and part of it for an institutional bank, you could do what banks are not doing, and that's invest in these downtrodden areas of our country. >> gillian, we've been talking about it for years, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines not coming back to america. how do we get it back here? >> almost $2 trillion. you've got average household earnings down over the past four years, poverty is up. we need this money working in our economy. how do we get it here? >> absolutely. i think the reverend's idea is very
. they really don't take into consideration the fact that we had the debt ceiling deal which was all cuts. that means they'll probably hold out for something that has cuts only. democrats won't take it, and we'll go over that proverbial cliff at the end of february. what's going to end up happening, i think, is that there's going to be incredible quick economic impact because of it. and that might persuade congress to go back and look at it and try to put in some sort of replacement. keep in mind, we just had a report a week ago that said that the economy shrunk in the fourth quarter in preparation for the sequester. not because the sequester hit, but in preparation for the sequester. so if that's just in preparation, i can't imagine what's going to happen when we actually do go through all the planning of going through sequestration. >> this is the worst on both levels. in the short run, it tends to be recessionary, if you will, it slows down an already slow economy. also by not discriminating between investment and spending, it really is the worst possible way to run this business calle
, and then the european credit crisis, as well as d.c.'s own fight over the debt ceiling. and then we were set to take off, all of a sudden we saw a big tumble in the stock markets and we saw job growth go back down again. i believe in august 2011 the initial report was zero net jobs. now they eventually revised that up to 100,000, but still an amemic growth rate. host: we continue our conversation regarding the 157,000 jobs added in january in the unemployment rate back now at 7.9% with patrick rice of politico. donald from statesville, north carolina is our next caller. donald is on our line for republicans. caller: hey, how you doing. i'm calling from statesville, north carolina, and we got some bad news here. freight liner who was in cleveland, north carolina, is going to lay off 750 employees. trim systems that supported them, they're closing their plant, 65 employees down to two. but here's my question, you know. when they do these job numbers, lowe's down here is going to hire 45,000 part time workers. does that count in the job numbers? or those are not even included? host: sorry about that donald
this fearmongering and screaming we did debt ceiling hostage crisis and all of that stuff. anyway, so not to discount your fear that we're going to be overtaken. >> well, yeah. that's paranormal. >> stephanie: we'll talk about this and much more as we continue. 19 minutes after the hour. it is "the stephanie miller show." >> announcer: funny how. funny like she's a clown. like she's here to amuse you. it's the "the stephanie miller show." he was a comedy genious. addicted to the spotlight and living too close to the edge. of all the hours in all his days, these are the ones you'll never forget. ♪ bad, bad ♪ >> stephanie miller. ♪ baddest girl ♪ ♪ in the whole damn town ♪ ♪ badder than king kong ♪ ♪ meaner than a junkyard dog ♪ >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." welcome to it. 24 minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. jake with the president carney. >> we created 2.2 million now with the revisions jobs in 2012. that means that we have been moving in the right direction when it comes to job creation. >> we're the jobs. where ar
the debt ceiling deal. he is a fiscal conservative. at the same time, on an issue like immigration, because the personal becomes political in his case. he is looking at what is best for america in terms of bringing these folks, many of whom didn't come here, you know, on their own steam, came here as young children. these people are americans just the way his family was. i mean, turns out that his grandfather was an undocumented immigrant. and because of special legislation that we have regarding cubans, the 1966 cuban refugee law, you know, he was allowed to become a citizen. so he is the beneficiary of this. he knows that we, of course, are a nation of immigrants. i think it will move him more towards the middle and move him as a person who can reconcile left and right. >> speak offing of immigrants, what is the back story -- i know there was cloudiness early on about his story about his family, about his upbringing. what have you cleared up there? >> well, michael grunwald wrote our story, and he cites this biography of came out on rubio i believe last year which actually determined that
. you know what they are doing down there. the debt is going through ceiling again, and they are not doing anything about it except talking, for 30 years it has gone higher and higher. lou: business holding 3 trillion-dollars, american business offshore, if you will, but on their books, and ready to investment if only they had clarity if only they had a clear vision, and there was not so much regulations and taxes were so high. have you seen a time when merge business leaders -- american business leaders were so weak? >> wait a minute, would you bring country back in the country with what is going on in washington? wouldn't you want to keep it abroad. lou: why do they keep supporting people who enable this weakness, do you remember when business leaders stood up and represented themselves instead of going to the you know, the -- what chamber of commerce. >> if they are supporting these clowns issue these people in washington who are doing this thing. they are reprehensible. lou: just weak-kneed, we need people with spines, and vision, jim rodgers, this is the book,
. just quickly, he refused -- voted against raising the debt ceiling. he co-sponsored the old balanced budget amendment, which is a total shuck and jive. he signed the grover norquist finds. he backed florida's voter purge back to rick so -- backed rick scott in trying to get all of those people, a lot of them racial minorities off of the ballot in florida. he opposed federal action to heavy prevent violence against women act, extension of it t he believes employers should be able to deny birth control to their employees. he made some robo calls for an anti-hate group opposing same-sex marriage, marriage equality. and he doesn't believe in climate change. in fact, this week at the interview that he gave with buzzfeed's ben smith -- remember ben smith was in studio with us a couple of days talking about that interview, marco rubio said, on climate change he just thinks it's too expensive. >> number one, even if anything we would do on that would have a real impact on our economy, but probably if it's only us doing it, a very negligible impact on the envir
. right now we're at 1.9, below replacement level. >>gretchen: you say forget the debt ceiling, forget the fiscal cliff. we have a demographic cliff, meaning that we have more older people now to sustain in our society and not enough young people coming up to keep the balance? >> right. that's what happens when you're below the replacement period for a long period of time. you have many more old people, fewer young people to support them. then you have to make choices. do you cut defense, cut benefits for the older people, do you raise taxes on workers? it winds up in a very bad situation. >>gretchen: let's look at the american family size. in the blue line, you're going to see, this is zero to two kids. that's been on the rise. in the red it's three-plus kids, which has been on the decline. i'm in the blue. i have two kids. you're currently in the red. you have three kids. but people having bigger families obviously for a variety of reasons is just not happening. >> it's harder. it's harder for all sofrts of reason -- sorts of reason. take, for instance, college. we are expanding educ
and cliffs and taking us to the edge, shutting down the government, not paying our bills by raising the debt ceiling and that is no way to govern the country. i am hopeful that new labels will give us a way to govern the country where we start out at least bleeding in trusting the other members across the aisle have come to congress for the same reason we have. >> what can you do to bring about a more thoughtful, pragmatic congress? i want to throw out three ideas that are beyond the scope of what knolls febles has taken on. -- no labels has taken on. it was not perfect. we have 150 saved seats. they fear their primary. number two, money.incentives.the . and sentence. the creation of money is one of the threats to democracy. where incentivize to do crazy things. i give two examples last night. when the season the outrageous on the floor, when a republican member calls the president a liar, when a democratic member says the republican health care program is don't get sick and if you die, die quickly. those statements damage the fabric of our democracy and they raised $1 million in 24 hours. w
and sequesters and potential government shutdowns, debt ceiling, we'll talk about that stuff. but we'll talk about it from the perspective on how we're making sure someone works hard in this country. a cop, teacher, a construction worker, or a reception worker, they can make it if they work hard. their kids can make it and dream bigger dreams than they have achieved. obviously, a lot of what we'll be working on over the next few weeks is going to be on how do we deal with this sequester issue. i want to make this quick point. i had a press conference this week in which i reiterated that i'm prepared, eager, and anxious that ends this government by crisis that every two week or every two months or every six months we are threatening this hard recovery, are finally housing is picking up and real estate is doing better and unemployment numbers are still too high. we're seeing job growth and manufacturing is doing well and we continue to have these self- inflicted crisis here in washington where suddenly someone taps the brakes. what i said this week was i want to do something big to provide cer
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)